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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
higher than irene in new york harbor. >> wow. >> irene didn't make flooding. but if you take irene and add four more feet to the top of that surge, you're well over battery park. you're well up above the seawalls on both the east river and the hudson. then you think about the other side. you think about hoboken, you could get water 12 feet higher than normal. what would that do to the property? what would that do to rthe refineries over there. >> it's been hugging the east coast for a while. are we talking about the del marvo area, is it east of that, or is that the quandary here. >> that's the $60 million question. we know this storm is still going straight. it is not forecast to continue straight. it will turn west and hit the u.s. if it turns quickly it will hit the del marvo and truly affect washington, d.c. with a significant bigger punch than is forecast now. >> with hardly any drainage. >> you push that water up to chesapeake and all of a sudden you have a significant basin that will take water and it will go up quickly. that's not the forecast. if it goes up north, it takes
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
to this storm after hurricane erin green. -- hurricane irene. this is an island. it is very vulnerable to flooding. that has been known for some time. need some sort of coastal defenses. >> thank you very much. for the last 24 hours, images have been coming in of the sheer strength left by sandy. here are a few photographs that capture these images. ♪ ♪ >> the extraordinary images of new york city, a city that all of us know so well, but it looks very different today. that brings the program to a close. i'm kathy kaye. thank you for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
% or more out at this hour. and as we saw with irene then again with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of folks. >> jeff stecker from wvit. thank you for that update. to the point he was making that it's so dark outside, there's so much water out there, there are so many downed lines. take this advice. this came from the fairfield police chief. "we have limited responsibilities, please stay inside your house and we are expecting massive damage." and i think that that would apply to communities up and down the eastern seaboard. we will continue msnbc's live coverage of hurricane sandy right after this. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. hurry in, offer ends soon! wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo
than lost power during hurricane irene. this is a monumental, monumental task that we have in front of us. i would ask them this week for their patience and then the week after that, we will need their resilience as we begin to go back to work and rebuild our state. but we're going to continue to work, we're doing search and rescue missions now, still. we have been doing them all day. we have been saving hundreds of people from places across new jersey and law enforcement is committed to continuing to do that until nightfall again tonight, then we'll start again tomorrow morning. >> you have a young family, are they all okay? where were they when this was going down? and what do you say to your children, what does any parent say to a child when this kind of catastrophe happens on their doorstep? >> well, first off, you give them a hug and say don't be scared, mom and dad will protect you. that's the first thing you do. second, my family was at our family home in mendham when we lost power finally late yesterday afternoon. the state police moved them down to the governor's residence
with the cold air. however, irene... dissipated in strength but not this one. but the purple, blue, the pink are all flood wind and snow warnings. there is a lot going on and as i mentioned it is going to be rather stagnant. we are going to see out regis ringbolt accumulations not to mention the storm surge is coming in from the ocean without regis rainfall out reg--outrageous we will see some rain but nothing compared to the east coast. that is not going to be impacting us until the end of the week by thursday. dense fog, overnight over the golden gate. with reduced visibility. sunny, mild and the more cloud coverage and cooler temperatures. the chance of rain, later for tonight. taking a look at the dense fog advisory. visibility will be sharply reduced in the areas that we see white. and keep that in mind for your morning commute. the 70's with 72 in santa rosa, '60s and '70s to pleasanton. 73 and san jose. it is not expected to push through until i said until wednesday morning. the clouds will repressing in for the giants. drizzle and we can see that it is well offshore. by 8:00 p.m. it
and it is getting colder. it is not like we didn't know the storm was coming. we had learning moments with irene and another winter storm that hit us with a punch and a lot of the simple things they do not communicate properly and we do not have the out of state crews work properly with our local utilities and con-ed still is not delivering dry ice. i have been personally out there delivering the try ice that has been provided and when you get off the back of the truck the ice was gone. people need it. >>neil: but it is more than that. i know in tokyo or places that are ravaged by earthquakes and tsunamis with each one they build a stronger building, but here, they build the same transformer that is no more upgraded to withstand serious weather than the prior one and we are right back in the same pot. >>guest: i share the senate homeland security committee and i will reach out and continue to reach out to the governor and my colleague, outside of new york -- outside of jerusalem, new york city is the number one target for terrorists. the utilities view manpowers and hours as an expense and new y
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
and down the shore. >> it is just like nothing i have ever seen before. you know, we had irene. last year we had a nor'easter in '92. i remember as a kid hurricane donna but nothing like this. there are so many people stranded without shelter. and the damage to the public infrastructure, to the boardwalks, municipal buildings, firehouses it is just endless. bill: frank pallone, thank you. we're going to stay in touch with you and a lot of others down there and hopefully get the word out. if we can help in any way making the word more public we certainly will, sir. thank you and good luck to you and your family. >> thank you. bill: frank pallone, democrat on the jersey shore. waking up to a whole new world as so many people are. >> sandy's wrath is extending into west virgina. have you seen the snow that got dumped on west virgina. look at this scene. blizzard conditions there. up to three feet of snow in some parts of the state. we're live there on the ground now. we're going to tell you what is going on. bill: while we continue to deal with that storm damage we can not forget this. you'r
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
're talking about experience with these bad storms. hurricane irene hit this place last year and the people here had the experience of this kind of flooding, but not as rapid as what we've been seeing. we have been in a constant -- [ no audio ] >> we lost david mattingly, obviously, technically, as you can imagine it is very difficult to maintain contact. that's why i'm talking on the phone. we literally got knocked off the air a short time ago. let's bring in chad myers, who is monitoring events in the severe weather center. what are we looking at in terms of timeline now for folks who are watching this and trying to figure out how long they're going to have been staying in their homes, how long this is going to last? when is the water going to peak, when will we start to see some of this water receding and how long is this thing going to be lasting for? >> i don't think we'll see the water recede enough through the low tide that we won't have another high tide on top of what we're seeing now in some spots. we could continue this flooding for another two tide cycles so at least another alm
with katrina and irene and so on, you look to see how individual governors and states and indeed, the federal level, have coped with this. from what you're seeing, what you're hearing and picking up, are you impressed with the preparation? are you concerned still? >> i mean, this is the first disaster i've gone through in new york city and i mean, just as a resident of the city, it seems pretty well run. i think there's always going to be things that happen and you just can't keep the ocean out of your city if the ocean's determined to get in. >> i think mayor bloomberg has been spot-on, actually. he's done a series of press conferences. he seems to be completely on top of the brief. he's prepared everybody. there's always going to be, i can't believe this, still idiots who are out there today jogging next to the water. why would you be so stupid? listen to what the mayors, the governors, president, everyone is telling you, get inside and be safe. >> i think curiosity is an incredibly powerful force. we can watch the news on tv but sometimes it's right down the street and it's very hard not t
. 18,100 latest number of flights cancelled. it makes irene look like nothing. there it was some 10,000 flights cancelled then. it cost delta for example 15 million in profits back then. that gives you an idea what the airlines are going to be looking at with this storm. >> bill: we don't -- >> shepard: we don't know when laguardia is going to reopen. estimates how much this could hurt the economy. one thing is perfectly clear the impact will be substantial. >> yeah. here is what i think we are looking at 1-2 punch. first of all we have people staying home at work not getting paychecks. we have businesses that aren't operating here in new york city which is typically a 4 billion-dollar a day economy. could shave a tenth off of national g.d.p. but then we have all these federal dollars come in longer term we will see some kind of benefit from that it's going to take a while for it to play out. $20 billion the colmes of this storm. >> shepard: construction workers and on and on. there may be a dip in unemployment as a result of this. markets were closed for the second time. try tomorr
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
've been through this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene much worse than other states. six weeks later we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 million people in our little -- our customers in our little state without power. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some of those towns are 97% of people without power. we're getting used to it and becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme we've seen governor cuomo talking about it as planning on it to be the new normal. climate change is so politicized but if we are seeing frequent things of things that aren't supposed to happen what are you to do differently that you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these frequent and continuing events. >> i've been talking about climbed change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure, that is literally lift it up off the ground and we have to think of our cities very differently than we thought about t
hurricane irene last was 13,000. double the damaged and down power lines. we have utility crews to restore power but in many cases we don't have enough crews who can remove trees and debris. you can hardly drive anywhere on long island without having to detour because a tree is down against a power line. now, the federal government has something called the national forest service. we need the national forest service with personnel and with chain saws to deploy to long island to help remove the downed trees, the debris, get the power lines back up and the electricity flowing. this is a public safety emergency. it's a public health emergency. it's all related to power. and so, we now need to move from search and rescue mission to a power restoration mission. >> have you called fema? have you called other officials to try to get other help as you described? >> i have. i just left a meeting at the federal staging area at republic airport and there's a national forest service representative there. they actually have crews from the national forest service they have been september to long island.
people, customers, without power in new jersey now as after hurricane irene a year ago and gives you a sense of the depth of the problem here. 60% of the state does not have power. and again, it's going to take a while. yes, there is some frustration but i think people are understanding that this is a really severe calamity that hit this place and you can see along the jersey shore places like this, a beach front property, a restaurant obliterated and what president obama and governor christie are seeing as they fly up and down the shoreline. we saw marine one go by in a convoy with helicopters about ten minutes ago and making their rounds. but i don't think a lot of people expect a lot from the federal government in the short term. >> yeah. >> right now people are just trying to deal with their immediate needs, moving in with neighbors, staying with friends. we have heard reports that some utility companies are talking about perhaps turning off water services, for example, because there could be contamination in the system. people are hunkering down and the work is just beginning. i
this was an unprecedented event. we weathered hurricane irene 14 or 15 months ago with the same emergency preparations and it didn't come close to endangering the hospital. this hospital sits 20 feet above sea level, we're actually 15 feet higher than nyu hospital next door because the terrain rises slightly here, so it was obviously not anticipated that we would get a storm surge of this magnitude, the national hurricane center was predicting even at its highest 11-foot storm surge, so clearly here out of the east river, just because of the way the waters were being pushed and the level of the wind speeds, we wound up getting a lot of water here. we've never seen anything like this at bellevue hospital. >> thank you very much. we appreciate your taking the time tonight. >>> the monumental task of removing debris and getting the lights turned back on is under way on long island, new york. complicating matter this is evening, roadways are still blocked by floodwaters and preventing about 5,000 utility workers from even starting to restore power to parts of that island. republican congressman peter king
during irene. i want. i live across the river. they were -- they say they're fine but i said get observe here, i'll take you home. >> any word on when they will come out? are officials going for them in boats or trucks? do you know when they're going to arrive? >> looks staggered. i got one aunt and took her to a cousin's house. yeah, go outside, flag someone down. >> right. it's hard to get information. best of luck. this is the case. officials are doing the best they can but it's hard to keep tabs who is here, who is not. we see cars streaming in all the time as people go in. water here. there are towels, dry clothes. people are coming off trucks and boats with just the clothes on their back, maybe a small bag, some have no shoes. trying to get them as much as they need. officials on the teeterboro airport came over looking for someone saying we've got supplies, we want to help you out and give you supplies. imagine officials more than happy to hear that. but these residents are absolutely shocked. not expecting this. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
irene. and that of course was just last year. wow, soledad. that is a monster, monster storm. those are very scary-looking graphics. zoraida, thanks for that update. ahead this morning, going to take a short break. ahead, we'll talk to a family that was trapped by the floodwaters. they've got photos to show us of what they went through. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. why they're always there to talk. i love you, james. don't you love me? i'm a robot. i know. i know you're a robot! but there's more in you than just circuits and wires! uhhh. (cries) a machine can't give you what a person can. that's why ally has knowledgeable people there for you, night and day. ally bank. your money needs an ally. introducing the new 13-inch macbook pro, ♪ with the stunning retina display.
hurricane irene it wasn't so bad here. certainly this storm is a new category. when it comes to cleaning up here, it will take a long time. >> jennifer davis, thanks very much. >>> it's hard to even understand that kind of devastation when you see it. it's like -- jenny is right, a bar of soap sitting there. >> i've been to devastation like that, and tv doesn't really -- we look at it and go, that's terrible, it doesn't really capture it. >> right. >> it's extraordinary. >> certainly can't capture the human pain associated with it. >> right. >> yep. it's been tough. going to continue to be so, i'm afraid. >> you hate to say we dodged a bullet, you don't feel comfortable saying that when people are hurting so bad. what's going on today? >> right. i want to do trick or treat. turn the corner into something more fun. >> we need to know. >> here we go. the good news is, i think we'll be dry. not a lot of wind. fine conditions. a little cool, and a creepy chill. [ creepy laugh by tony ] >> tony, that was pretty good. or was that you, allison? upper 40s as trick or treaters head out to take care
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
a mandatory evacuation thinking last year's hurricane irene wasn't so bad. so did many of her neighbors. the owners of this house barely survived. they fled their home at 6:00 monday night. it broke apart soon after. neighborwide david scharf finds himself searching for keepsakes of places where he learned to ride a bike. >> i grew up here basically in my childhood home and it's basically gone. the water ripped through here last night and this morning and it's utter devastation. >> reporter: your parents still live here? >> my parents still live here. they are safely in brooklyn, and we're trying to salvage the remnants of what's left of the home. >> reporter: what would you like to find for your parent's sake? >> i'd like to find some photographs, for my children's sake my childhood photographs. i'd like to find some things from my grandparents that my grandparents had here. these are real treasures. hopefully we find them. >> reporter: chief james mcnally says his fire fighters fought hard to save this neighborhood. have you ever seen anything like that before where you simply couldn'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)